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Quilty Bits & Bobs

1 Jul Happy Canada Day! PC215 Canadian Shield

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Fellow Quilters,

I’ve got lots of quilty bits and bobs to share with you today.  My colleague Millie laughs every time I say this.  What are bits and bobs, you ask?!?  Odds & ends.  Tidbits.

My friend Linda Hahn of Frog Hollow and her bestie Deb Stanley host a weekly event Wednesdays at 3pm EST on Zoom called Sew What! Zoomcast – it’s quite entertaining.  Linda interviews a different guest quilting celebrity each week, then Deb does a quilt-related demo, and the hour-long zoomcast winds up with prizes.  Who doesn’t like free stuff?!?  Past guests have included Stevii Graves, Banyan Batiks Creative Director Karen Gibbs,  and last week’s guest Joyce Hughes.  Joyce thread paints on quilt panels to create truly stunning pieces of art and tells me that anyone can achieve the same results.  This week’s guest is the iconic Nancy Mahoney.  To watch, log into Zoom using Meeting No. 708 847 7971 Password 541374.  Linda has invited me to be her guest on July 15th so mark your calendar!  Same meeting and password.

Did you see my Facebook Live post on June 16 as part of the June edition of the Designers Tips & Techniques Virtual Show?  You can still watch the rerun on my Patti’s Patchwork Facebook page.  The video is somewhat fuzzy – of course my test run was clear as a bell.  Hubby has picked up a new stronger modem so my next post should be much better.  Yes, I’m doing it again.  July SMThe July edition runs from noon until 8pm EST July 7 – 9 and my time slot is July 8 at 4pm.  The schedule is here.  I hope you’ll tune it to learn lots of quilty goodness.  I watched all the episodes last month and really enjoyed it.

Fellow designer Andi is coordinating a Patriotic Quilt Mashup – a video slide show of patriotic quilts just in time for July 4th.  I shared videos of 2 quilts from my PC236A Panel Plus pattern.  I snapped a photo of one of the quilts taped to the outside wall of the cabin.

PC236A Panel Plus pattern option #1

Happy July 4th!  PC236A Panel Plus pattern option #1

I’ll be sharing the mashup video on my Patti’s Patchwork Facebook page as soon as Andi posts it.  Fun!

I’m also participating in a 1-day Christmas in July event on July 15th (it’ll be a busy day!).Christmas Pattern Hop (1)  Each of the 21 bloggers is sharing a freebie so you can get started on those quilty Christmas gifts.  What better time to start than now?  I love, love, love Christmas quilts, and will be sharing a pattern for one.  If you’re a blog subscriber you’ll automatically receive the link.

Also happening the week of July 13 – 17 is the awesome Quilt Designer Shop Hop – 10 designers – 10 websites – 10 blocks.  Each designer has created a block for this fun virtual hop and will be sharing it for free during the hop.  Designer Shop Hop Badge 1-3We created our blocks in Electric Quilt, so each of us will also be coming up with unique layouts for these stellar blocks.  I’ll be blogging and Facebooking (is that even a word?!?) on July 16 as part of this exciting event.

In my last post I shared a photo of my mammoth-leaf basil plant and asked for advice on how to help it flourish.  Well, my SIL came to my rescue and suggested that, when I want to harvest some, I prune it from the top, thereby ensuring that the plant doesn’t start to flower.  I googled this and, sure enough, if I cut a stem just above a 2-leaf split, I can force the plant to grow 2 stems where 1 existed.  I’ll let you know in a week or 2 if this is successful.

I also had to resort to google to fix my broken sewing chair.  The hydraulics were dying a quick death.  Every 5 minutes I had to lift the seat back up.  The quick fix I saw online, if I don’t mind the chair being always at a fixed height, was to remove the base, insert a length of PVC pipe and reattach the base.

My steno sewing chair with a quick fix

My steno sewing chair with a quick fix

My handy son had a spare piece of pipe, so 15 minutes later my chair was fixed (for me).  I’m a happy camper!  I’ll eventually paint it, but for now it’s good :).

I’ll see you in a week or so.  In the meantime, Happy Canada Day and Happy 4th of July!

Happy Canada Day! PC215 Canadian Shield

Happy Canada Day! PC215 Canadian Shield

Cheers,

Patti

Who would like some Stag & Thistle?

11 Jun

Fellow Quilters,

This is a quick post with a couple of updates and reminders – quick because I know some of you are very busy trying to get your Time to Quilt quilt-along tops assembled for tomorrow’s deadline.

In my last post 2 weeks ago I asked for some inspiration and motivation from you so I could finish my Super-size Shimmer quilt top.  I offered up a fabric prize as YOUR motivation to send me a picture of your assembled top or finished quilt by end-of-day tomorrow June 12th.  Your picture can either be emailed to me at patti.pattispatchwork@gmail.com or posted on my Patti’s Patchwork Facebook page.  To further motivate you I snapped a photo of the lovely prize – a fat quarter packet of all 14 pieces from new Northcott designer Brett Lewis’ premier collection Stag & Thistle.

Who would like a fat quarter pack of Brett Lewis' Stag & Thistle?

Who would like a fat quarter pack of Brett Lewis’ Stag & Thistle?

It is gorgeous!  I debated about keeping it for myself and finding something else for the prize before my moral compass re-aligned itself.  I look forward to seeing your photos.

In my last post I also shared that I would be doing a Facebook Live post as part of the Designer Tips & Techniques 3-day event June 2-4.  Well, the event was postponed and rescheduled to June 16-18. Revised June SM The full schedule is here and my time slot is June 16 at 2pm EST.  It will still be my very first Facebook Live and I hope to see you over on my Facebook page.  I have also signed up for the July 7-9 schedule and my time slot is July 8 at 4pm.  I should be much better for the 2nd event 😊.

I wanted to keep the Wednesday at 3pm time slot open because my friend Linda Hahn hosts a weekly Facebook Live event called Sew What! Zoomcast.  She posts the zoom link on her Facebook page and replays the weekly post on YouTube (just google Sew What! Zoomcast on YouTube to find the previous recordings).

My feeble attempts at gardening continue.  I stopped at a local nursery to pick up 2 patio plants and added 2 cherry tomato plants and a basil plant to my purchase.  I have a delicious recipe that uses cherry tomatoes and basil.  I’m not sure what type of basil I bought but the leaves are enormous.

My new basil plant has enormous leaves

My new basil plant has enormous leaves

I want this plant to flourish so if anyone has advice on how I should care for it please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Time to head into my sewing room to finish a magazine project and practice my Facebook Live again…

Cheers,

Patti

Finishes and Future Fun

30 May

Fellow Quilters,

Apparently I have slipped back into my pre-Time-to-Quilt-quilt-along blogging schedule.  It’s been 3 weeks since my last post – where does the time go?!?  Spring garden clean-up has taken some of that time.  After weeding the beds, I divided some daylilies and planted 2 flats of annuals that Hubby bought.  I must admit that I am not a very good or enthusiastic gardener.  Except for a few obvious species, I can’t tell the weeds from the perennial flowers.  My friend says a weed is just a flower that you don’t like.  I feel that way about the mini begonias that Hubby bought.  I have never liked begonias.  I think I shall do the flower buying next year – just saying.  I have left quite a few green sprouts in several of the beds, waiting to see if they are more recognizable in another week or two.  I almost pulled out all the Evening Primrose thinking it was a weed.  Hubby bought the last rhubarb plant in town – a scrawny pathetic thing – that will probably need 3 years to establish itself before I can harvest any.  The rhubarb plant at our old house was finally at a stage where it was producing a nice sized crop.  I really wanted to dig it up and bring it with us when we moved last year but thought the hole in the ground surrounded by bricks might be rather obvious.  I would also like to plant 2 pear trees though Hubby says he needs to do some re-leveling of our backyard before that can happen.

So, speaking of the quilt-along, I managed to get 2 of my sets of blocks sewn into quilt tops AND quilted.  The FIGO Midsommar mini one was easy – small, with straight-line quilting.

Midsommar-time quilt done!

Midsommar-time quilt done!

I used a variegated thread with orange, pink and purple – it was perfect.  I loaded it on my longarm machine and used the channel lock function to stitch perfectly even straight lines in no time flat.  I used my extra test blocks on the back for a splash of color.

The back of Midsommar-time

The back of Midsommar-time

Then it was on to the Vino version.  I added the outer borders and loaded it on my machine.  I decided to use some plastic Baptist Fan templates for the quilting – I haven’t used them in forever.

Plastic Baptist Fan templates

Plastic Baptist Fan templates

I pulled out what seemed like half my thread stash and finally decided on a variegated thread.

The variegated thread matches nicely with the prints.

The variegated thread matches nicely with the prints.

I threw the quilt on my son’s bed (when he comes for an overnight stay) just to take a photo and I’ve decided that it belongs there.

My Vino Time-to-Quilt found a home.

My Vino Time-to-Quilt found a home.

So that leaves the stack of super-sized Shimmer blocks.  I’m not motivated so I’m asking for your help.  Inspire me!  Show me your finished Time to Quilt quilts or quilt tops.  You can either email me a picture of your quilt/quilt top at patti.pattispatchwork@gmail.com or post a picture on my Pattispatchwork Facebook page.  If you do this by June 12th (my son’s birthday), your name will go into a draw for a bundle of fabric.

Speaking of Facebook, I am participating in a fun 3-day event June 2-4. Designer Tips Banner SM lo-rez The Designers Tips & Techniques Virtual Show takes place from noon until 8pm each day.  Each participating quilt designer has selected a time slot and will do a 15-minute Facebook Live post at the top of their hour, demonstrating their tip or technique.  The schedule is here.  My time slot is June 3 at 3pm, and I am madly researching how to do a Facebook Live post.  Between you and I, I am very nervous!  What if my post doesn’t go live as planned?  What if I forget what I’m going to say, or leave out vital details?  What if my internet goes down part-way through my talk?  Hubby has jury-rigged a device to hold my phone – lots of duct tape was involved.  I still have several dry runs to do before June 3.

I am also participating in a Designers Shop Hop July 13-18.  Just like with a traditional shop hop, each designer will have a free unique block pattern in their online shop for the duration of the hop.  Quilters travel online to each shop to collect the block patterns and see what each designer has done with the blocks to make a quilt.  Stay tuned for further details – I’ll be posting more information on my Pattispatchwork.com website, on Facebook and in a future blog post.

Time for me to do another dry run of my Facebook Live demo…

Cheers,

Patti

Tips for on-point layouts

9 May Our fruity concoction as a reward for getting my quilt top (almost) done

Fellow Quilters,

Happy Saturday !  I was sitting down yesterday to write my blog post when my plans got derailed.  Back on track now.  I am sitting at my kitchen island “office” looking at snow flurries outside my window.  Hellooo!?! It’s May!?!  It’s supposed to be 17°C (60°F) at this time of year.  No matter, I suppose, if I need to stay inside and social distance – a good opportunity to get my Time to Quilt blocks sewn together and into a quilt top.  If you’re following along, Northcott has a backing prize up for grabs.  For your chance to win, select at least 12 of your blocks and assemble them in a quilt top, then go to Northcott’s Facebook page on Monday May 11th to post a picture of your quilt top.

So, on Wednesday I talked about assembling your blocks in a straight setting using the same principle we used to sew some of our blocks together.  The chain-piecing of each row of blocks to the next row makes assembly of our blocks and quilts warp-speed.  The added bonus is that it keeps the units or blocks in the correct orientation and order.  I showed how I will sew my FIGO Midsommar make-it-mini blocks together – straight-set with no sashing strips between the blocks.  So how do we apply this concept if we have an on-point setting such as the one I’ve selected for my Vino quilt?  Let me show you.

My Vino blocks laid out in an on-point setting

My Vino blocks laid out in an on-point setting

Here is a photo of my quilt blocks laid out in my almost-final arrangement.  Now, I needed 50 blocks for this, so I quickly whipped up another pair of Block 4 since it was so fast.  Even though I am putting sashing strips between the blocks and cornerstones at the intersections of the sashing strips I have not laid them out with the blocks because I don’t need to – I will add them as I’m sewing the blocks together.  So you may be thinking that this doesn’t look easy to sew into rows.  Let’s take another picture, on an angle this time – can you see the rows and columns now?

We pick up the units in columns 2-12 from bottom to top

We pick up the units in columns 2-12 from bottom to top

Just like for the straight-set layout, we’ll pick up the blocks in all but the first column from BOTTOM TO TOP.  We’ll include the setting triangles as well, keeping them aligned as they are in each column (this part is important).  Note that the first “column” is just the corner triangle. Then we label each stack and flip all but the first column so that the pinned label is still at the top edge.

Label each stack and pin the label to the top edge so that all the pieces are attached

Label each stack and pin the label to the top edge so that all the pieces are attached

I leave the corner triangles from Stack #6 and #7 aside – I’ll add them at the end.

The bottom triangle from Stack 6 and top corner from Stack 7 are set aside and attached at the end

The bottom triangle from Stack 6 and top corner from Stack 7 are set aside and attached at the end

Gather them up in order and take them to the sewing machine.  I’ve got my pile of sashing strips and cornerstones handy as well.

My piles of cornerstones and sashing pieces are handy

My piles of cornerstones and sashing pieces are handy

We are going to add our sashing/cornerstone pieces between each stack of blocks.  Now, for Step 1 let’s take that first column (the corner triangle) and add a vertical sashing strip to it – center the triangle on the sashing piece so that there is ⅜” of triangle protruding beyond the top and bottom edge of the sashing (remember this tip from Block 3?). For Step 2 we are going to add Stack #2, but notice that there is nothing to sew the setting triangle units (the first and last pieces in our stack) to.

Steps 1-3

Steps 1-3

We can add the block to the sashing piece and we can also add the horizontal sashing pieces above and below the block by sewing them to a cornerstone (see Step 2 in the diagram).  Step 3 is adding a vertical sashing/cornerstone column – we can add the triangles from Stack #2 at this point.  We continue adding stacks alternately with vertical sashing/cornerstone columns, also including the horizontal sashing pieces between the blocks in each stack.  My mantra as I’m working is “wide (block) column, then narrow (sashing) column”.

Continue adding Stacks 3-12

Continue adding Stacks 3-12

By the time we’re finished sewing the stacks together, the piles of sashing and cornerstones are gone.  Then we sew the horizontal rows together.  I pressed all my seams toward the sashing.  This means that I pressed away from the cornerstones, and everything nested beautifully when I sewed the horizontal rows.  Here is my quilt top at this point, just waiting for the outer border.

Just waiting for the outer border

Just waiting for the outer border

Now, because I wanted full cornerstone squares around the perimeter, I had to use extra-large setting triangles and add them at different stages than I do when I usually sew an on-point layout – it requires another level of concentration and coordination (ugh!).  Apparently 2 large mugs of tea is not enough caffeine for this job, so I had some unpicking to do.  I timed myself while assembling this quilt – it took 6½ hours.  Let me know how you do!  I rewarded myself with a beverage courtesy of the mixologist – a homemade concoction of banana, apple juice, crème de cacao and orange-flavored Blue Curacao (which made it green).

Our fruity concoction as a reward for getting my quilt top (almost) done

Our fruity concoction as a reward for getting my quilt top (almost) done

Speaking of the mixologist, Hubby finally selected a winner from the comments left on May 2nd’s blog – it is Judy Duffy.  Congratulations to Judy!

Good luck with your quilt tops.  I look forward to seeing them on Northcott’s Facebook page on Monday.

Cheers,

Patti

 

Warp-speed quilt assembly

6 May Tuesday's cocktail du jour

Fellow Quilters,

Good Wednesday morning!  Are you continuing to Stay-at-Home-and-Quilt?  I had a conversation with a friend recently – she was asking what we had learned about ourselves during this stay-at-home period.  For me it’s probably been virtual learning, though sadly not much in my life is different since I work from home.  Hubby has learned to borrow virtual books from the library.  And he has learned several new cocktails.  The most recent ones were a choco-nut banana “martini” that I think is really more of a blender drink (he bought too many bananas and we’re trying to use them up before the fruit flies find them).

Sunday's choco-nut banana beverage

Sunday’s choco-nut banana beverage

Also a chocolate-orange-banana concoction using a homemade chocolate orange tawny port (yum),

Monday's cocktail

Monday’s cocktail

and most recently a modified version of White Russian using Goldschlager – he had a miniature bottle of this and wanted to use it.

Tuesday's cocktail du jour

Tuesday’s cocktail du jour

He doesn’t like cinnamon so he didn’t use much.  Apparently Goldschlager will be on the menu again soon.

So, big news on Northcott’s Time to Quilt Facebook page – there is another prize up for grabs.  Northcott is throwing in a backing prize.  To qualify, create a quilt top with at least 12 of your blocks by Monday May 11 and post a picture on Northcott’s Facebook page.  The winner will receive enough backing for their top.

Today’s tip:  I have a great tip for you today – it’s all about assembling your blocks into a quilt top.  Remember way back on Day 6 when I talked about sewing the units of your block together and keeping the rows connected by a thread chain?  I also talked about this on Day 7 wen we sewed the center part of Block 7 before adding the large triangles to the corners.  So, we can apply the same principle to assembling our blocks into a quilt top. I worked with the FIGO blocks for this example. I arranged my blocks in 8 rows of 6.

My FIGO blocks are arranged in 8 rows of 6

My FIGO blocks are arranged in 8 rows of 6

Notice which blocks are in the first and last rows (top and bottom).  Okay, now I stacked the blocks in Column 1 in order from top to bottom, so #1 was on the top and #8 was on the bottom of the pile, keeping the top edge of each block at the top edge of my stack.  I basically walked down the quilt, adding each consecutive row’s block to the back of my stack. I pinned a #1 tag to the top center of my stack.  Then I started on Column #2.  I picked up the last block (Row 8), then added the block in Row 7 to the back of my stack, then the block in Row 6 to the back of the stack, and so on until I got to Row 1.  I now have a stack of the 8 blocks from Column 2 with the block from Row 8 on the TOP of the stack and the block from Row 1 on the bottom of the stack.  I pinned a #2 tag to the top center of my stack.  I continue to Column 3, working from bottom to top – the block from Row 8 is on the top of the stack and the block from Row 1 is on the bottom of the stack.  All the columns except the first on are picked up from the bottom to the top.

The first stack has blocks 1-8 (1 on top) and the rest of the stacks have blocks 8-1 (8 on top)

The first stack has blocks 1-8 (1 on top) and the rest of the stacks have blocks 8-1 (8 on top)

When you look at the photo you will notice that the block on stack #1 is from Row 1 and the blocks on stacks 2-6 are from Row 8. THEN I flip Stacks 2-6 over so that they are face down AND the pin is still at the top.

Flip Stacks 2-6 over so that the pin is still at the top

Flip Stacks 2-6 over so that the pin is still at the top

See that pin at the top?

See that pin at the top?

This keeps the blocks in the correct alignment in the quilt. Now I can take stacks 1 & 2 to the sewing machine and sew them together.  Stack 2 is ready to be added to Stack 1 – the block on the top of the face-down stack is from Row 1 and it’s in the correct alignment to be sewn to the right edge of the first block in Stack 1.  Once I sew Stack 2 to Stack 1, I pin my #2 tag to the Row 1 or top block. I grab Stack 3 and sew the blocks to the Stack 2, then continue, adding Stacks 4-6.  All the blocks are attached in a lattice and all the vertical rows have been sewn.

Each stack has been added - the vertical seams are all sewn and thread chains connect the rows to make a lattice

Each stack has been added – the vertical seams are all sewn and thread chains connect the rows to make a lattice

I usually finger-press the seams in the odd-numbered rows to the left and the seams in the even-numbered rows to the right.  Now I simply sew my horizontal rows.  Done!

Tomorrow or Friday I will show you how to apply the same concept to an on-point layout with sashing as I assemble my Vino quilt.  It makes assembling the quilt 3 times faster than sewing each row together, then placing it back into the layout and sewing all the rows together.  I will also announce the winner of the free pattern then – Hubby hasn’t made his choice yet and he’s gone to pick up a rack of moose antlers from his harvest last Fall.  They’re not going to hang above the fireplace, that’s all I’m saying.

Cheers,

Patti

Super-size options

3 May My blue, green and purple blocks arranged in an on-point setting

Fellow Quilters,

Good Sunday Morning!  If you’ve been following along with the Time to Quilt quilt-along and read right to the end of yesterday’s post you know there is a prize up for grabs if you post a comment about the quilts shown in yesterday’s post.  Silly me – I forgot to include a deadline – so the deadline to leave a comment to be eligible for the prize is Tuesday May 5th at 11:59pm EST.  Thank you for all your comments so far, and for the lovely emails that I have also received.

I’ve got a few more quilt ideas for you to consider today, as I alluded in yesterday’s post.  I played around with my 12” super-size Shimmer blocks and came up with some ideas that could also work with the 9” blocks.  Let’s take a look.  My original Shimmer quilt with the 4 color palettes I selected was rather colorful.

My original design idea for my 12" Shimmer blocks

My original design idea for my 12″ Shimmer blocks

Partway through the quilt-along I decided to replace some of the color in the blocks with black and my resulting quilt looked like this.

My revised design with black in some of the blocks

My revised design with black in some of the blocks

I liked it much better – I found that the black calmed it down.  I had an email conversation with one of my fellow BMQG members who was following along and making the 12” blocks – we discussed different layout options.  I mentioned that this version is rather large – 94” x 118” – and I might consider removing a row of blocks to bring the quilt down to 94” x 107” and use the extra row of blocks in a bed runner.  I still wasn’t entirely happy with my color choices for this quilt, so was also considering taking out the coral blocks and using them for another smaller quilt.  So I opened up EQ and started playing.  By selecting only the blue/green/purple blocks and placing the blocks on-point I came up with this arrangement and a size of 94” x 113”.

My blue, green and purple blocks arranged in an on-point setting

My blue, green and purple blocks arranged in an on-point setting

Now I like this quilt! Okay, let’s play with the coral blocks.  I recolored 2 pairs of blocks to remove some green and purple and placed the blocks on-point with an alternate block.  Here’s what I got.

My coral blocks set on-point with an alternate chain block

My coral blocks set on-point with an alternate chain block

How cool is that?  With a 4” border this quilt is 63” x 80”, a nice throw size.  Now, in EQ it’s very easy to make adjustments to quilts simply by clicking a button, so I wondered what size this layout would be if I used the 9” blocks instead.  Here’s what my quilt image looked like.

I reduced the block size to 9" but didn't change the border width - surprise!

I reduced the block size to 9″ but didn’t change the border width – surprise!

My work-around in EQ to get full squares instead of half-squares for those outer ½-blocks was to add a narrow border with triangles to make the other half of the square (you can see that inner border on the blue-green-purple version).  When I reduced the block size it reduced the length of those border blocks but not the height of them so the triangles became pointier.

The original border block (using cream instead of black) and the shortened block

The original border block (using cream instead of black) and the shortened block

Look at those outer large “squares” in the alternate blocks – they’re now arrowheads!  Haha!  An accidental design choice – I like it!  Have you made any accidental design choices?  Maybe ran out of one fabric and your substitute created a surprising but happy result in your quilt?

I think the few downpours of rain yesterday impacted the mixologist’s choice of cocktail – we had Hurricanes, not necessarily the cocktail of choice for a cruise, however they were quite tasty.

Hurricanes were on the menu yesterday

Hurricanes were on the menu yesterday

My friend Daphne has posted some notes on her blog about what she plans to do with her Tapa Cloth blocks,  Apparently she has recruited her resident mixologist as well 🙂

I’m off to get a pattern written today.  I have 1 more post relating to the quilt-along that I want to do, with a great tip for assembling your quilt.  If my pattern-writing goes well, I’ll blog again tomorrow, otherwise it’ll be Tuesday.

Cheers,

Patti

Time to Choose a Layout for Time to Quilt

2 May Vino #5 - 92" x 107" - with 8" border

Fellow Quilters,

I think Hubby is enjoying his new-found role of mixologist as we continue our virtual cruise to Europe.  Yesterday was Juno Beach with a side trip to Paris, so the cocktail du jour was French martini – a combination of vodka and gin, dry vermouth (Noilly Pratt of course, since it’s French) with a generous splash of Cointreau. Delicious!

Yesterday's cocktail was a French martini

Yesterday’s cocktail was a French martini

The latest round of weekly winners was announced on the Northcott Facebook page – were you one of them?  Check the post today to collect your prize.  And I see on FIGO’s Instagram feed that if you post a pic of your quilt top (that’s all the blocks sewn together, with borders and sashing if you’ve decided to go that route) by May 8 you’ll be entered for the grand prize drawing.  Well, let me give you some ideas for those blocks you’ve so meticulously pieced over the past 24 days!  PS.  If you haven’t started yet, or you’re not finished yet, there’s still time.

So, on Northcott’s Facebook page today there is a picture of a quilt made with all 48 blocks, sewn together without sashing between the blocks, and what looks to me like a 5” border.

Simplest option - no sashing, and 5" border

Simplest option – no sashing, and 5″ border

For this 64” x 82” quilt you’ll need roughly 40” of border fabric, cut into (7) 5¼” strips – join end-to-end and cut into (2) 72½” pieces and (2) 64” pieces.  Sew your blocks together in 8 rows of 6, then sew the 72½” strips to each side then the 64” strips to top and bottom edges.  Done!

On the Facebook page there is also a link to some finishing instructions.  The quilt shown in here has sashing – 1” strips between the blocks and finishes at 70” x 90” including the 4¾” border. I used this layout for my Vino #1 quilt, made with 9” finished blocks, and this is what it looks like.

Vino #1 with 1" sashing and 4 3/4" borders - finishes at 70" x 90"

Vino #1 with 1″ sashing and 4 3/4″ borders – finishes at 70″ x 90″

Then I opened up my Electric Quilt program and played (it’s so easy to “make” quilts in EQ).  I wondered what the blocks would look like on-point.  Daphne made some virtual quilts with on-point layouts during her daily Time to Quilt blog posts.  Here is my first rendition – no sashing and no borders – for a quilt that finishes at 64” x 77”.  Let’s call this Vino #2.

Vino #2 - 64" x 77"

Vino #2 – 64″ x 77″

Then I added 1½” sashing (cut 2”) to give the blocks a bit more space – Vino #3 finishes at 75” x 90”, similar in size to #1.

Vino #3 - 1 1/2" sashing to finish at 75" x 90"

Vino #3 – 1 1/2″ sashing to finish at 75″ x 90″

What if I made my cornerstones (the squares at the intersections of the sashing strips) a contrasting fabric?  It makes the quilt busier but it also adds interest – we’ll call this Vino #4.

Vino #4 - also 75" x 90" - with contrasting cornerstones

Vino #4 – also 75″ x 90″ – with contrasting cornerstones

For my final version, Vino #5, I added an 8” border to make the quilt 92” x 107”.

Vino #5 - 92" x 107" - with 8" border

Vino #5 – 92″ x 107″ – with 8″ border

So many choices!  It really depends on what size I want my finished quilt to be – a large throw, a twin-size or a queen-size.

I want your opinion here.  Please help me choose.  Which of my 5 options do you like best? Please post a comment below.  Also tell me which option you would choose for your blocks.  I will randomly select a winner (the mixologist does this, actually) to receive a complimentary pdf pattern from Patti’s Patchwork.

Tomorrow I will post some design options using the 12” super-size Shimmer blocks, and also a couple more ideas for the 9” blocks.  See you then!

Cheers,

Patti

 

Friday – finally block #24

1 May Same block, different options

Fellow Quilters,

Happy Friday 😊 Woo-hoo!  We made it to the 24th and final day of the Time to Quilt quilt-along.  If you’re following along, Friday is the day to pop on over to Northcott’s Facebook page and post a photo of your 2 favorite blocks.  Don’t forget to also like the page and the post for your chance to win some major swag.  You can also post your photos on Instagram and #timetoquiltfigo.  Good luck! I hear tell there might be a couple more prizes after today, maybe some quilt layout instructions on the Northcott Facebook page, and maybe even another quilt-along.  If you’re a subscriber to my blog, you’ll get all the details.  And please share my posts with your quilty friends/fellow guild members and encourage them to subscribe if you have enjoyed this quilt-along.  Shall we get to our final block?

Block 24 is similar to yesterday’s block but easier – no HST units in the corners.  Did you find yesterday’s tip about the order in which you add the sew-and-flip corners helpful?  When I was assembling the units in my super-size Shimmer version, I almost went rogue and changed the way they were arranged.  So many choices!

Same block, different options

Same block, different options

I didn’t make any changes to the original pattern on Northcott’s, Banyan’s and FIGO’s Facebook page, simply added pressing notes and the 3 size options.

As I was piecing my blocks I was reflecting on the tips I have shared for the past 24 days, and also the tips Daphne has shared on her daily blog.  Two that she mentioned bear repeating.

Tip #1:  Practice makes perfect.  While making all these blocks over the past 24 days I have found that my piecing skills have improved, as has Daphne.  How about you?  I think we can all agree that we are now experts at half-square-triangle (HST) units.  We’re better at snowball or sew-and-flip corners.  We’re now pretty good at 4-patch units too.  I’ve also become much better at mini-piecing, having worked on the 4½” make-it-mini version.  Some of you would say that isn’t mini, however it’s much smaller than I usually sew.  So give yourself a pat on the back if you’ve made all 24 blocks.

Tip #2:  Daphne posted a great tip about sewing those snowball corners.  Place a line of tape on your machine in front of the needle and make the bottom tip of your angled corner square follow the line of the tape.  This saves having to draw a line on every snowball corner square.  It also works for those HST units.

Tape lines on my Janome travel machine

Tape lines on my Janome travel machine

I have these tape lines on my Janome Gem travel machine, and I had them on my old sewing table when my machine was mounted into a table.  That table didn’t make the move when Hubby and I relocated last year. Now my machine sits on a different table so I don’t have enough space in front of the needle to really take advantage of this tip.

Tip #3:  I have used the same thread for all 3 versions for all 24 days – a medium beige and medium gray Aurifil.  These are my go-to colors.  I put one in the top and the other in the bobbin so that I know which thread is the top thread (it’s easier to unpick if I need to do any).

Medium beige Aurifil in the top and medium gray Aurifil in the bobbin

Medium beige Aurifil in the top and medium gray Aurifil in the bobbin

I was also going to give some tips on sewing machine feet however I shall save that for another post so stay tuned for that.

Here are my finished blocks.  Time to celebrate!

Block 24 done :)

Block 24 done 🙂

Here, by the way, was yesterday’s Stay-at-Home-and-Cruise cocktail du jour – Hubby’s version of an apple-tini since we were scheduled to be in Normandy.

Our version of an apple-tini for our Normandy port of call.

Our version of an apple-tini for our Normandy port of call.

You can find my instructions for Block 24 here.

Northcott’s blocks today are made with Material Girl and Banyan’s are done with Vintage Chic.  I wonder what FIGO is showing in their quilt today.

Speaking of quilts, I played around with my blocks yesterday in my EQ program and came up with some very nice arrangements.  Since today’s post is already long enough I shall save them for tomorrow.  You will be inspired!

I really would enjoy seeing your blocks and your finished quilts.  Please do share them with me, either by posting pictures on my Patti’s Patchwork Facebook page or by emailing them to me at patti.pattispatchwork@gmail.com.  I am also very interested in your feedback on this quilt-along and your favorite tip.  Please post your comments below.  Would you be interested in doing another one?  How often – daily, twice a week, weekly?  How many blocks?  What size of block/quilt?  If you’ve done other quilt-alongs, which one was your favorite, and why?

Thanks sew much, and I’ll see you tomorrow 😊

Patti

 

Wet days and White Russians

30 Apr We want the seam running toward us

Fellow Quilters,

It’s another rainy day here, perfect for quilting 😊.  Hopefully these April showers will bring May flowers.  The days are getting warmer so it won’t be long before the robin nesting outside our kitchen window has a nest full of babies.  Did you know that robins can have 2-3 clutches in a year? Hubby has been working on cleaning up the yard while I work on quilt blocks.  Next week is forecasted to be sunny so I will likely get out to putter as well, though truth be told I’d rather putter in my sewing room.  It is nice, though, to get outside, even just for a walk around the block.

Yesterday Hubby and I selected Belgium as our port of call on our stay-at-Home-and-Cruise, and he chose to make a cocktail that originated in Brussels – the Black Russian.  Who knew?!?

White Russians - our modified Belgian cocktail of the day on our Stay-at-Home-and-Cruise

White Russians – our modified Belgian cocktail of the day on our Stay-at-Home-and-Cruise

He decided to cut the sweetness by turning it into a White Russian by adding cream – yum!  He tells me he has another Belgian-based cocktail planned for today.  I’ll keep you posted.

Block 23 in the Time to Quilt quilt-along is straight-forward.  I made no changes to the pattern on Northcott’s, Banyan’s and FIGO’s Facebook page, however I did add pressing directions – I wonder if mine vary from Daphne’s.  She likes to press some of her seams open to disperse the bulk of many layers of fabric.  You can pop over to her blog here to find out.  While piecing this block I did find a tip that I would like to share with you.

Today’s tip:  When making the units with the two sew-and-flip squares on the end, you will find it easier to add them in a specific order.

Making the side units on Block 23

Making the side units on Block 23

Let me show you.  Add the first sew-and-flip square, pressing the triangle toward the corner and trimming the excess ¼” beyond the seam line – easy-peasy.  Now, it is easier to add the 2nd square so that the tail end of the square is overlapping the first square, not so that the leading end is overlapping the first square.

The unit on the left is harder to sew than the unit on the right

The unit on the left is harder to sew than the unit on the right

Why?!?  Because we want the seam for the first square to be toward us so that it doesn’t get caught under the feed dogs.

We want the seam running toward us

We want the seam running toward us

Once these units and the ever-present HST units are done, the blocks go together quickly.

Block 23 done - we're almost finished!!

Block 23 done – we’re almost finished!!

You can find my instructions for Block 23 here.

Today Northcott’s blocks are made with the lovely Tree of Wisdom (the textures in this collection are gorgeous!) and Banyan is using Creative Director Karen Gibbs’ favorite collection Ride On.  If you have any cycling enthusiasts in your life this collection is just perfect for a quilt for them. Over at FIGO, Christina has used Away We Go for her post today – love it!

Just a reminder to head over the Northcott’s Facebook page tomorrow and post a photo of some of your blocks for a chance to win some cool swag.  You can also post the on Instagram and include the #timetoquiltfigo for the FIGO prizes.  Good luck!

Cheers,

Patti

Cocktails, crusts and creases

29 Apr Essential pastry-making items: a pastry blender (U-shaped thing), rolling pin, pastry cloth and sleeve

Fellow Quilters,

Yesterday was a sea day on our Stay-at-Home-and-Cruise.

Banana daquiri was yesterday's cocktail

Banana daquiri was yesterday’s cocktail

While Hubby prepared the cocktail-du-jour – a banana daquiri – I prepared turkey pot pie.  Back on Day 9 of the Time to Quilt quilt-along I also made turkey pot pie and mentioned that I would show you my pastry tools the next time I make pastry.  Well, I almost forgot!  I quickly snapped a couple photos before the dinner went into the oven.

Making pastry for my turkey pot pie

Making pastry for my turkey pot pie

My 4 essential items for pastry-making are:

  • a pastry blender (the U-shaped wire thing) used to cut the fat (shortening, butter, lard) into pea-sized pieces into the flour
  • a rolling pin – I prefer a longer one to make bigger sheets of pastry
  • a sleeve to cover the rolling pin. This is a knitted tube.  It prevents the pastry from sticking to the rolling pin, and they’re really hard to find.
  • a pastry cloth – mine is a piece of muslin that I picked up at the fabric store (I serged the edges to prevent them from raveling). This prevents the pastry from sticking to the work surface and makes it super easy to roll the sheet of pastry around the rolling pin to place it on the pie.

    Essential pastry-making items: a pastry blender (U-shaped thing), rolling pin, pastry cloth and sleeve

    Essential pastry-making items: a pastry blender (U-shaped thing), rolling pin, pastry cloth and sleeve

My mom used to make pastry regularly and did not use a pastry cloth and sleeve – we didn’t know they existed. My dear sweet MIL was not much of a baker however she had a set and gave it to me – bless her heart.  What a godsend! No more scraping pastry off the counter or rerolling the pastry because the rolling pin grabbed a corner and now a swath of pastry is wrapped around the rolling pin.  My go-to recipe is 2 cups flour, 1 cup shortening, ¾tsp salt (combine with the pastry blender until you have pea-sized pieces of shortening) then with a fork add a mixture of 1 egg, 1tbsp vinegar & 2tbsp water and combine with the flour mixture just until blended. I sprinkle 2-3tbsp of flour on the pastry cloth, roll the sleeved rolling pin through it once, then roll out half my pastry.  Easy peasy!  I store my cloth and sleeve in a ziplok bag in the fridge.

So, on to Time to Quilt Block 22.  More HST units, and a square-in-a-square in the center.  I thought of another tip for sewing this unit.

Today’s tip:  To correctly align my triangle pieces on opposite sides of my center square, I finger-press my square in half vertically and horizontally.

I finger-press my center squares in half vertically and horizontally

I finger-press my center squares in half vertically and horizontally

Then I line up the point of the triangle with this crease mark.

I align the tip of the triangle with the crease

I align the tip of the triangle with the crease

Fast and easy!  That square-in-a-square unit is done in a flash!

Repeat with the remaining 2 triangles

Repeat with the remaining 2 triangles

Next thing I knew my blocks were done.

Block 22 done :)

Block 22 done 🙂

You can find my instructions for Block 22 here.

A couple days ago I mentioned the current issue of Love of Quilting magazine and the great article on disappearing blocks.  One of the blocks shown in the article is very similar to Block 22 – the only difference is the center unit – a pinwheel instead of a square-in-a-square.  When I was pressing my blocks, I thought how fun they would be in an on-point layout in a quilt, so in Electric Quilt I whipped up 2 samples.

The positive and negative versions of Block 22, the similar disappearing pinwheel version and 2 on-point quilts showing these blocks

The positive and negative versions of Block 22, the similar disappearing pinwheel version and 2 on-point quilts showing these blocks

One has just Block 22 in positive and negative, and the other has Block 22 combined with the disappearing pinwheel block from Love of Quilting.  How fun!

On Facebook today Northcott has used the same blue Shimmer fabric in their sample as I used in mine – this is totally serendipitous!  Banyan has used Scott Hansen’s Ocean Park for a summer-fresh look.  On her blog today Daphne has also played with the layout options and even thrown in some color changes to add interest.

Enjoy your day.  It’s a wet one for me- perfect for quilting!  Sewing machine, here I come 😊

Cheers,

Patti